How we use the “Pupil Premium” at Singleton C of E School

Since 2012, Singleton C of E School has been able to access the ‘Pupil Premium’ grant to further support the education of its students who have claimed Free School Meals (FSM) during the previous six years. The Pupil Premium is funding in addition to the School’s budget that is used to support the attainment of the most vulnerable pupils.

In 2017/18 the school provisional pupil premium allocation is £

Number of pupils and pupil premium grant (PPG) received for the academic year 2017/18
Total number of pupils on role 101
Total number eligible for PPG 12 (As of April 2017)
Provisional amount received for the academic year 2017/18 £ 15, 840

 

Pupil Premium Coordinator

Leonie Millward

Pupil Premium Governor

Laura Walker

Pupil Premium Strategy reviews November 2017, April 2018, July 2018
What are our Key strategies to close the attainment progress gaps for FSM and Pupil Premium Pupils at Singleton School
·         A rich, stimulating, exciting yet engaging curriculum for all

·         ‘Growth Mind-set’ – developing a culture of ‘Limitless Potential’

·         Linked to ‘Growth Mind-set’ developing resilience, self-worth and a culture where ‘challenge’ is embraced

·         Quality teaching and learning experiences

·         Quality – self-evaluation of the impact of the provision we provide – (termly audits – reviewing and evaluating the  effectiveness of provision)

 

KS2 SATs results 2017 :-

Pupil premium – 6 children Reached expected In Greater depth (above 110)
Math’s 6/6 2/6
SPAG 6/6 2/6
Reading 6/6 3/6

 

  Reading Writing (TA) SPAG Maths R, W & M R, W & M + R Average Scaled SPAG Average Scaled M Average Scaled
National 2017 71% 76% 77% 75% 61% 5% 104 106 104
Cohort (14) 100% 86% 100% 100% 95.3% 45.3% 111.6 108.7 108.85
Disadvantaged 100% 93% 100% 100% 97.6% 33% 109.6 107.5 106
Teacher Ass. 93% 86% 93% 93% 91% N/A N/A N/A N/A

 

Teaching and learning

Singletons main expenditure will be on our family learning Mentor who will continue to provide support and guidance to help our children who are experiencing difficulties in learning due to social, emotional or behavioural problems.

This year we have evaluated the role based on the needs of our children and have made some changes to the provision we will offer. Moving forward we will provide-

  • homework support after school
  • At lunchtime our Family Learning Mentor will focus on ‘developing play’ and will be a line manager to our lunchtime staff and will lead training.
  • Group work to develop language and social skills – run by our Family Learning Mentor
  • Emotional support provision – individually or in small groups

Running alongside the Learning Mentor we also run additional provision for cognition and learning within the afternoon. These groups / one to one sessions are run by our Teaching Assistants and are closely monitored by our SENCO

Curriculum

We constantly evaluate the curriculum provision we provide ensuring that it reflects the needs and the aspirations of our school. We run a creative curriculum and emphasis is put on learning outdoors. Our assessment systems are constantly evolving and they are extremely thorough enabling us to ensure that we are closing the gap for disadvantaged children.

Enrichment

As well as offering a variety of free sporting and musical opportunities our provision map also focuses on emotional, social, and behaviour support. These sessions are run by the family learning mentor and we believe they are vital in improving and developing language, friendship and social skills to equip the children with the skills that they need to be successful in life.

PSHCE (Personal, Social, Health and Citizenship Education)

We believe that a child’s state of mind or mental health plays a vital role in their ability to learn and reach their full potential.  In order to realise their potential a child needs to have resilience to cope with the challenges that life brings – both academically and socially. The role of our family Learning Mentor we believe is vital – in that they lead the development and understanding of resilience with our most vulnerable children and they run provision groups within school. The family learning mentor also coordinates and actively secures support from other agencies such as Trinity Counselling Services, Jigsaw and Steeping stones etc. to ensure that our provision supports our children’s needs.

Main Barriers to Educational Achievement

The challenges we face include:-

  • Low income
  • Poor home learning environment
  • Challenging relationships within the home
  • Specific leaning difficulties (SEN)

How we will measure impact

We will continue to close the gap for educational achievement – through the constant monitoring and evaluation of pupil progress and individual learning, emotional, social and behavioural needs of the pupils. Each term our Pupil Premium Lead carries out an audit of the provision / progress of the pupil, the findings of which feed into our next step actions.

We will measure their progress academically

We will evaluate the impact of the additional provision lead by the learning mentor to develop their resilience by the impact on the child’s progress and the development of their resilience within learning and within life

How the money will be spent in 2017 /18

At Singleton School these funds are spent in many ways to support vulnerable families targeted by the Pupil Premium funding. Examples of how “Pupil Premium” has enhanced our provision include:

  • Deploying a member of staff to the post of Learning Mentor to oversee the main outcomes and support for FSM and vulnerable children and to liaise with relevant staff who work with these particular children.
  • Providing additional academic support for FSM children who need to boost progress or be challenged further
  • Providing financial support towards additional costs of education such as trips
  • Providing financial support to allow every FSM child one free (normally paid for) extra-curricular activity after school per week for the whole year.
  • Providing financial support towards uniform and equipment
  • Additional Educational needs resources

Due to the success of our previous pupil premium strategy, and its positive impact on the attainment and progress of the children in receipt of this fund, we will continue to utilise Pupil Premium money in the same way as detailed below.

We will also use the money to fund additional hours for the Family learning mentor – to provide lunch time support with behaviour/ socialising and friendships. Also additional hours for after school clubs such as homework club

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In 2016/17 the school pupil premium allocation was £15,840 

At Singleton School these funds are spent in many ways to support vulnerable families targeted by the Pupil Premium funding. Examples of how “Pupil Premium” has enhanced our provision include:

  • Deploying a member of staff to the post of Learning Mentor to oversee the main outcomes and support for FSM and vulnerable children and to liaise with relevant staff who work with these particular children.
  • Providing additional academic support for FSM children who need to boost progress or be challenged
  • Providing financial support towards additional costs of education such as trips
  • Providing financial support to allow every FSM child one free (normally paid for) extra-curricular activity after school per week for the whole year.
  • Providing financial support towards uniform and equipment
  • Additional Educational needs resources

Examples of impact in 2016/7 include

We are very proud of the achievement of all our pupils, especially our FSM youngsters, for whom the playing field is seldom a level one. We were inspected in March 2017 and the findings indicated that Pupil Premium is used very effectively in our school.

Our latest Ofsted (2017) indicated: –

Pupil premium finding is used very effectively to reduce any barriers to learning that may be experienced by disadvantaged pupils. The progress of pupils supported by this funding is monitored rigorously. The impact of pupil premium funding is evaluated carefully by the headteacher and the governors, This enables disadvantaged pupils to be successful and be part of everything the school has to offer.

In 2016/ 17 we only had one child in KS1 and 10 children in KS2 which makes data analysis in terms of patterns and trends difficult. However, six of the children were in Year 6, which will mean that we can make comparisons with the Key Stage 2 SATs results.

The impact of how we use this additional funding to support the collective needs of our most vulnerable children can be measured in the outcomes they have achieved;-

Our SATs results indicate the following:-

  • At KS1 we have no data to report on as there was no pupil premium children in the cohort.
  • At KS2 there were 6 pupils in receipt of pupil premium funding:-
    • 100% met the expected standards in Reading, Maths, SPAG tests.
    • 33% gained in Greater depth in Maths /SPAG
    • 50% Greater depth Reading
    • 17% greater depth writing

Our most recent Ofsted indicated the following:-

“Pupil premium funding is used very effectively to support disadvantaged pupils. As a result, they make outstanding progress by the end of Key Stage 2. Disadvantaged pupils’ attainment is similar to other pupils in school and above others nationally. This is because the school monitors the progress of these pupils effectively and regularly and ensures that they are supported well to improve.” (Ofsted March 2017)